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Best Password Managers

Best Password Managers

A few years back, remembering password was writing it on a piece of paper and keeping it safe. But with advancement in technology and the number of devices we use, it’s becoming difficult to carry that piece of paper with you everywhere.

Before all it took to be a great password manager was to keep your passwords in an encrypted vault. Now the best password managers give you the option to sync or keep them local only, change web passwords with a click, log in to sites for you, and more. Today we are looking at three of the Best Password Managers.( Not in order of preference)

1.LastPass

LastPass

The service was one of the first well-rounded password managers available, and one of the first that really made it easy to store all of your passwords either online and synced with other computers and devices, or locally on one device. In short, LastPass remembers your passwords so you don’t have to, and makes it easy to audit your passwords, use stronger passwords in general, and even automatically change a password for you if a service has been hacked or compromised.

LastPass supports two-factor authentication for your password vault using Google Authenticator, USB devices (using a method we’ve outlined before). The service picked up a much-needed update a year or so ago to streamline the UI and make it easier to use, and sports a number of additional features like credit monitoring, secure password and document storage (and sharing), notifications when a site you have an account with has been hacked, tools to autofill forms and streamline online shopping, and more. LastPass supports Windows, OS X, Linux, Android, iOS, Windows Phone, and Blackberry, and has plugins for Chrome, Firefox, Safari, Opera, and Internet Explorer. It’s free to download and use, but if you want its best features and the mobile apps, you’ll need to upgrade to LastPass Premium, at $12/yr.

Available On: Mac, Windows, iOS, Android, Windows Phone, Blackberry

Price: Free Trial and Premium $12/year


 

2.Dashlane

Dashlane

Dashlane launched in beta back in 2012, and has risen to prominence since largely because of its attention to its interface (which is sharp and easy to use), simple security, easy auto-login, form auto-fill, and logging of purchases and orders from online shops. It’s picked up a number of updates since then, including support for two-factor authentication, the ability to share passwords with emergency contacts in case you can’t access your accounts, and most recently, the ability to change multiple passwords on dozens of websites with a few clicks. Dashlane will also notify you if you have an account on a site that’s hacked, and with its built-in password changer, you can have Dashlane reset the password to a new, unique, strong one without leaving the interface.

If you want to change all your passwords at once, you can do that too. The purchase tracking and digital wallet features make it easy to make online purchases even at retailers you don’t have accounts with, and search all of your online orders in one place, while secure note and document sharing gives you a place to store passwords that can’t be automatically filled in. Dashlane also gives you the option to store your passwords locally only in an encrypted vault (where only you have the master key), or to sync them to your devices and access them on the web.

Available On: Mac, Windows, iOS, Android

Price: Free and Full Version for $40/year


3.1Password

1Password

1Password is well loved and well-regarded for offering a powerful and secure password manager and digital wallet in a really sharp-looking package that shines on every platform it runs on. It’s flexible, easy to use, works seamlessly in just about every web browser, and packs in the same features that you’ve come to expect from a premium password manager and secure document storage tool. 1Password looks great, comes with a strong password generator to help you pick good passwords every time you change one, secure notes for other passwords or notes that you want to keep private, a digital wallet for bank accounts and payment info, and a password “recipe” builder that lets you customize your passwords to your demands instead of just accepting whatever algorithm the password generator spits out at you.

Perhaps best of all, 1Password can be used locally only, without syncing any information to the web, or you can use it across all of your devices by syncing your encrypted vault via Dropbox, iCloud, Wi-Fi, or shared network folders, it’s completely up to you. You can also set up emergency contacts and share passwords with authorized users. You can even keep multiple vaults for different types of passwords.

Available On: Mac, Windows, iOS, Android

Price: Free and Premium $70/year


In Our Opinion 1Password is the best you can get

Let us know which Password Managers you use in the comments below. Follow us on Social Media to stay updated with our latest content!

 

 

 

 

Bhavin

Tech Enthusiast. Technology is a place where I find Solace!

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